MAP-21, the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (P.L. 112-141), was signed into law by President Obama on July 6, 2012. It is the first long-term highway authorization enacted since 2005. It sets highway safety as a national goal. 

The changes brought about by MAP-21 are extensive and impact almost every area

Swift, like many trucking companies, has a history of destroying evidence that shows they were at fault for a wreck. I have posted on this previously. That is one of the reasons it is important to hire a lawyer as soon as possible when you have a trucking case.

Recently, in an Arkansas case, the trial

One of the the requirements of every trucking company before they put a truck on the road, and every truck driver before they get behind the wheel of a tractor trailer, is that they both must agree to follow the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. These are the regulations that keep us, the public, safe on

I have previously posted on how manufacturers of cabs don’t seem to care if a truck driver lives or dies. Trucking companies and truck manufacturers treat drivers like disposable objects, worrying far more about the bottom line than the driver’s safety and training. The fact is trucks don’t include many of the safety features that car drivers

Trucking companies, as corporations, can only act though people. In trucking cases companies will often hire experts that give the company the answer they want (That the company isn’t responsible and it is the truck accident victims fault) rather than the truth. In many cases evidence is also allowed to be destroyed, even when the company knows

While trucking companies acknowledge that hair tests show a much higher number of drivers with drug problems than conventional drug testing, most still don’t use this modern and efficient test.

C.R. England, a large national trucking company, found when it switched to hair tests for drugs that the positive rate for drivers shot up to from 2.8%

In a Tractor Trailer rollovers, who is to blame is frequently a major issue. Federal regulations generally require the driver to bear responsibility for the loading, and faulty loading, of the trailer. However an exception is made for loads that are sealed. www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/administration/fmcsr/fmcsrruletext.asp Who then is responsible? Generally speaking it is the company that loaded and