The new Hours of Service (HOS) regulations go into effect today. In many ways these regulations are simply the old, pre-President Bush, regulations with some minor changes. Nonetheless, you can expect the trucking industry to be up in arms. I have posted on the new HOS previously HERE

The outrage is primarily because the trucking

I have been talking to some of the finest trial lawyers across the United States with about how they handle trucking cases and issues in the trucking industry. I have asked a number of them provide blog posts and will add guest blogs from them as I receive them.  

Nelson Tyrone is a tractor trailer accident

One of the things you do when handling a trucking case, whether as a plaintiff or a defense lawyer, is to audit the drivers logs to determine if the driver was over hours and driving in a fatigued state. I have blogged on fatigued driving extensively in the past. A key in auditing logs is to get all

I have been fortunate to work with many great lawyers around the country on Truck Accident, Spinal Cord and Brain Injury cases. One such lawyer is Pete Everett of Fairfax, Virginia. Pete Everett, a great trucking lawyer who has a breathtaking knowledge of traumatic brain injuries, sent me the following information on a new sleep apnea study in the Australian trucking

I thought the new Hours of Service (HOS) Regulations made sense, and that there wouldn’t be much controversy about the new regulations. After all, the new regulation just put back into place the old rule. The old rule required drivers of 80,000 pound tractor trailers to stop after driving 10 hours.  The law was changed under President Bush

The FMCSA and the trucking industry knows how dangerous sleep apnea is for a truck driver. The FMCSA states HERE that: 

Staying awake means staying alive. Sleep apnea is a major contributor to daytime drowsiness—a condition that could prove deadly for commercial truck drivers and everyone sharing the road with them. It is a condition where,